This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.
5 Aug, 2015

Why Do Ice Breakers Suck So Much? (And How to Bypass the Awkwardness)

By | 2016-10-25T01:48:00+00:00 August 5th, 2015|Categories: Workshop Design & Facilitation|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

 

I don’t like ice breakers.

From the first workshop I remember attending to the workshops I attend now, I don’t like ice breakers.

I don’t even like including ice breakers in my own workshops. When you’re done developing your workshops and you’re all excited, nothing let’s you down quicker than remembering you forgot to include an ice breaker.

“Tell us one interesting fact about yourself”. “Choose an adjective that describes you using the initial of your first name”. “Two truths and a lie”. Announce that you’re about to start an ice breaker activity, and be prepared for the deep sighs and low groans.

(And everyone knows your two truths are lies too.)

I thought it was because I’m an introvert. There’s nothing more anxiety-provoking than sitting in a circle and waiting for your turn. Your heart begins to beat faster at the thought of speaking in front of strangers, hoping that your voice doesn’t crack or that you stutter. For me, I don’t like being the center of attention (which is kinds odd as a workshop facilitator, but anyway). But it’s not an introvert thing. Even the extroverted of the extroverts I know don’t care for ice breakers.

One of the reasons we hate ice breakers is because they feel forced. Participants come to your workshops already with the mindset that they’ll be interacting with each other in some capacity. The difference between an exercise within a workshop versus an ice breaker is that the interactions within an exercise can be more natural and allows participants to talk to one another without the icky discomfort that comes with ice breakers.

Whether you like ice breakers or not, they’re here to stay. Here are some tips on creating ice breakers that make sense and are enjoyable (at least as much as an ice breaker can be enjoyable):

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10 Jun, 2015

Ask Nicole: How Did You Pass the LMSW Exam on the First Try?

By | 2016-10-25T01:48:00+00:00 June 10th, 2015|Categories: Social Work|Tags: , , , , , , , |4 Comments

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Here’s a question I recently got from a Raise Your Voice reader:

Hi Nicole! I am currently studying to take the licensed master of social work [LMSW] exam in my state. I’m a little nervous because I’ve been out of graduate school for a few years now. While I’ve been working as a social worker since then, I feel so far removed from studying that the thought of actually taking this exam brings up a lot of anxiety for me. Can you share what you did to take the LMSW exam and pass it on the first try?

Before I give my advice on preparing for the LMSW exam, I want to share the process I underwent that led me to pass the LMSW exam on my first try. As a disclaimer, this is what *I* did. In no way am I’m advocating for anyone to do the same. 

I graduated from my social work graduate program in May 2010, and I took the LMSW exam on March 31, 2014. I’m mentioning this for one important reason: While I do recommend taking the exam as soon as you’re eligible to take it (which depends on your state. There are some states that will allow you to take the exam during the final month of your graduate program), it is possible to take this exam and pass it years after graduation.

Some things I considered prior to registering for and taking the exam:

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3 Jun, 2015

You Didn’t Feel Like Blogging This Week Too? (and Helpful Ways to Ditch Your Blogging Slump)

By | 2016-10-25T01:48:00+00:00 June 3rd, 2015|Categories: Miscellaneous|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

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(image courtesy)

Sometimes, when you know you’re supposed to do something and you don’t feel like it, you’ll get a little sign that confirms that you need to do it.

That came three weeks ago in the form of a blog post I saw on Pinterest by creative business consultant and brand designer Julie Harris.

And last week, I checked my inbox and saw this post by entrepreneur Christine Kane.

 

I know the benefits of having a blog: You have the opportunity to position yourself as a thought leader in your area of expertise, and you can connect with other people with similar interests. Having a blog is useful because, as speaker and entrepreneur Michael Hyatt says, a blog is your “home base”. In comparison to your social media networks (which Hyatt identifies as your “embassies”), you can have a consistent presence, but those networks can disappear at any time. Your blog will always remain (unless you don’t renew your hosting.)

But some of the gripes I have about blogging are the same gripes everyone else has: Not having the time, being consistent, not knowing what to write about, the fear of others not agreeing with your stance, not getting any comments (or getting too many trolling comments), or the idea that no one will read it.

Between social work, evaluation, and reproductive justice, there’s plenty I could write about, but at times it feels like a chore! I’m too embarrassed to admit to the number of times I started writing a blog post, and decided to close my MacBook and take a nap instead.

So, what have I’ve done in the past (that I know I need to start back doing) to help me step up my blogging game when I’d rather be doing something else? Here are my tips:

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